"I love the past, cause I hate suspense"

Black Rimmed Blogger.
21 year old film student attending college in the great city of Chicago.

I enjoy films, high quality television, good music, Woody Allen, beautiful women, handsome men I wish I was, and the occasional sexy thing.

Check out my latest short film, Well, Hot Dog! I’m really happy with it, and I want as many people to see it as possible!

Reblogging this would be awesome and much appreciated. Thank you!

One of my favorites. So easy to watch. #francesha #gretagerwig #blackandwhite #film

On set of my latest film, MY KIND OF TOWN.
Seeing BLUE IS THE WARMEST COLOR #film #cinema #blueisthewarmestcolor (at Landmark Century Centre Cinema)

Here’s two more from Well, Hot Dog.

A few stills from my newest short film Well, Hot Dog that I wrote, directed and also starred in.

Possibly my favorite Woody Allen line.

(Source: allen-bergman, via deconstructingwoody)

Pre Film #cinema #film #theater #culture #musicbox (at Music Box Theatre)

fuckyeahdirectors:

Director series by Kelly Puissegur

(via parislemon)

cinephilearchive:

72 years ago today, Jacques Kubrick gave his son a camera. Happy Birthday Stanley.


Watching a Kubrick film is like gazing up at a mountaintop. You look up and wonder, how could anyone have climbed that high?” —Martin Scorsese “Among those whom I would call ‘younger generation’ Kubrick appears to me to be a giant.” —Orson Welles “It’s so hard to do anything that doesn’t owe some kind of debt to what Stanley Kubrick did with music in movies. Inevitably, you’re going to end up doing something that he’s probably already done before. It can all seem like we’re falling behind whatever he came up with.” —Paul Thomas Anderson “He copied no one while all of us were scrambling to imitate him.” —Steven Spielberg “A Clockwork Orange is my current favourite. I was very predisposed against the film. After seeing it, I realize it is the only movie about what the modern world really means.” —Luis Buñuel “I really love “Eyes Wide Shut”. I just wonder if Stanley Kubrick really did finish it the way he wanted to before he died.” —David Lynch “Each month Stanley Kubrick isn’t making a film is a loss to everybody.” —Sidney Lumet “It’s the best of the best. No film can hope to top it (Kubrick’s 2001).” —Ridley Scott “Stanley’s good on sound. So are a lot of directors, but Stanley’s good on designing a new harness. Stanley’s good on the colour of the mike. Stanley’s good on the merchant he bought the mike from. Stanley’s good about the merchant’s daughter who needs some dental work.” —Jack Nicholson “I love almost all of Stanley Kubrick, there’s almost no Stanley Kubrick I don’t love. I love Lolita, I love Dr. Strangelove. I love A Clockwork Orange, obviously. I even like a lot of Barry Lyndon (laughs). And early stuff, like The Killing and Paths of Glory. … It’s ridiculous. Look, he made the best comedy ever, he may have made one of the best science fiction movies ever, he made the best horror movie ever. I couldn’t watch the end of The Shining. I went through half The Shining for years before I could finish, because I’m a writer and as soon as he starts writing “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” I had to turn it off. It’s almost like Picasso in that he mastered so many different genres. … he took his time and patience and he had a crew of like 18 people. They were very handmade movies these were not large behemoths that he did; they were very thoughtful and his editing process was long. He’s kind of without peer really. If I was gonna settle on a director, probably Kubrick.” —Gary Ross  “From a storytelling point of view, from a directing point of view, there is one thing I associate with what [Kubrick] does, which is calm. There is such an inherent calm and inherent trust of the one powerful image, that he makes me embarrassed with my own work, in terms of how many different shots, how many different sound effects, how many different things we’ll throw at an audience to make an impression. But with Kubrick, there is such a great trust of the one correct image to calmly explain something to the audience. There can be some slowness to the editing. There’s nothing frenetic about it. It’s very simple. There’s a trust in simple storytelling and simple image making that actually takes massive confidence to try and emulate.” —Christopher Nolan “Single greatest American director of his generation.” —Oliver Stone “I admire Kubrick greatly. He is often accused of being a prodigious technician and rigid intellectual, which people say makes his films very cold. I don’t agree. I think that “Barry Lyndon” or “A Clockwork Orange” are the most perfect marriages of personality and subject.” —Guillermo del Toro

Happy Birthday Stanley Kubrick | July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999


All the essential documentaries on Stanley Kubrick, including Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001), Stanley Kubrick’s Boxes (2008), A la Recherche de Stanley Kubrick (A. Michaux, F. Benudis 1999), The Art of Stanley Kubrick: From Short Films to Strangelove (2000), Cinefile: Stanley Kubrick - The Invisible Man (1996), Stanley Kubrick: Rare Dutch documentary, Without Walls: Forbidden Fruit (1993), Full Metal Jacket: Between Good and Evil (2007), Making A Clockwork Orange, Rare 1960s Audio: Stanley Kubrick’s Big Interview with The New Yorker, Still Tickin’: The Return of A Clockwork Orange (2000), 2001: The Making of a Myth (2001), Making ‘The Shining’ (1980), Steven and Stanley, Remembering Stanley Kubrick: Steven Spielberg (Paul Joyce 1999), Barry Lyndon production, The Visions of Stanley Kubrick (2007), Lost Kubrick: The Unfinished Films of Stanley Kubrick (2007), and Inside the Making of “Dr. Strangelove.”

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cinephilearchive:

72 years ago today, Jacques Kubrick gave his son a camera. Happy Birthday Stanley.

Watching a Kubrick film is like gazing up at a mountaintop. You look up and wonder, how could anyone have climbed that high?” Martin Scorsese

“Among those whom I would call ‘younger generation’ Kubrick appears to me to be a giant.” Orson Welles

“It’s so hard to do anything that doesn’t owe some kind of debt to what Stanley Kubrick did with music in movies. Inevitably, you’re going to end up doing something that he’s probably already done before. It can all seem like we’re falling behind whatever he came up with.” Paul Thomas Anderson

“He copied no one while all of us were scrambling to imitate him.” Steven Spielberg

“A Clockwork Orange is my current favourite. I was very predisposed against the film. After seeing it, I realize it is the only movie about what the modern world really means.” Luis Buñuel

“I really love “Eyes Wide Shut”. I just wonder if Stanley Kubrick really did finish it the way he wanted to before he died.” David Lynch

“Each month Stanley Kubrick isn’t making a film is a loss to everybody.” Sidney Lumet

“It’s the best of the best. No film can hope to top it (Kubrick’s 2001).” Ridley Scott

“Stanley’s good on sound. So are a lot of directors, but Stanley’s good on designing a new harness. Stanley’s good on the colour of the mike. Stanley’s good on the merchant he bought the mike from. Stanley’s good about the merchant’s daughter who needs some dental work.” Jack Nicholson

“I love almost all of Stanley Kubrick, there’s almost no Stanley Kubrick I don’t love. I love Lolita, I love Dr. Strangelove. I love A Clockwork Orange, obviously. I even like a lot of Barry Lyndon (laughs). And early stuff, like The Killing and Paths of Glory. … It’s ridiculous. Look, he made the best comedy ever, he may have made one of the best science fiction movies ever, he made the best horror movie ever. I couldn’t watch the end of The Shining. I went through half The Shining for years before I could finish, because I’m a writer and as soon as he starts writing “All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy,” I had to turn it off. It’s almost like Picasso in that he mastered so many different genres. … he took his time and patience and he had a crew of like 18 people. They were very handmade movies these were not large behemoths that he did; they were very thoughtful and his editing process was long. He’s kind of without peer really. If I was gonna settle on a director, probably Kubrick.” Gary Ross

“From a storytelling point of view, from a directing point of view, there is one thing I associate with what [Kubrick] does, which is calm. There is such an inherent calm and inherent trust of the one powerful image, that he makes me embarrassed with my own work, in terms of how many different shots, how many different sound effects, how many different things we’ll throw at an audience to make an impression. But with Kubrick, there is such a great trust of the one correct image to calmly explain something to the audience. There can be some slowness to the editing. There’s nothing frenetic about it. It’s very simple. There’s a trust in simple storytelling and simple image making that actually takes massive confidence to try and emulate.” Christopher Nolan

“Single greatest American director of his generation.” Oliver Stone

“I admire Kubrick greatly. He is often accused of being a prodigious technician and rigid intellectual, which people say makes his films very cold. I don’t agree. I think that “Barry Lyndon” or “A Clockwork Orange” are the most perfect marriages of personality and subject.” Guillermo del Toro

Happy Birthday Stanley Kubrick | July 26, 1928 – March 7, 1999

All the essential documentaries on Stanley Kubrick, including Stanley Kubrick: A Life in Pictures (2001), Stanley Kubrick’s Boxes (2008), A la Recherche de Stanley Kubrick (A. Michaux, F. Benudis 1999), The Art of Stanley Kubrick: From Short Films to Strangelove (2000), Cinefile: Stanley Kubrick - The Invisible Man (1996), Stanley Kubrick: Rare Dutch documentary, Without Walls: Forbidden Fruit (1993), Full Metal Jacket: Between Good and Evil (2007), Making A Clockwork Orange, Rare 1960s Audio: Stanley Kubrick’s Big Interview with The New Yorker, Still Tickin’: The Return of A Clockwork Orange (2000), 2001: The Making of a Myth (2001), Making ‘The Shining’ (1980), Steven and Stanley, Remembering Stanley Kubrick: Steven Spielberg (Paul Joyce 1999), Barry Lyndon production, The Visions of Stanley Kubrick (2007), Lost Kubrick: The Unfinished Films of Stanley Kubrick (2007), and Inside the Making of “Dr. Strangelove.”

(Source: missavagardner, via francinethesechocodiles)

[Only God Forgives] is pure cinema. And pure cinema upsets audiences, because most filmgoers don’t know how to read movies visually, and so they get mad at a film that operates on that level. Most of us act as though a film’s job is to simply tell a story, and tell it well, but if we insist on that base level of cinematic language, on pulling down film and imprisoning it in the confines of narrative, we cheat ourselves and our storytellers out of an entire universe of communicative mediums. Refn’s films exist as his characters strive to – outside of the sphere of common society. They are in and of themselves, and speak to us on their own terms with their own language. Only God Forgives is thankfully his most shameless and indulgent, and it is his best. Let it happen to you. - Harrison Foster on Only God Forgives.

(Source: howtocatchamonster, via nicolaswindingrefns)

Is Pacific Rim destined to be an epic flop?

thegoddamazon:

redlanternzoom:

zimrathon:

thescienceofjohnlock:

icantcu:

Unacceptable.

I don’t have many followers, I know this.  But tumblr is more than than the followers you have, the ears that first hear your voice when you shout, when you cry.

Reblog this.

Get the word out.

If giant robots fighting giant monsters flops on our watch, on this generation’s turn at bearing the torch of nerdom, we shall forever be remembered as the generation that lost it all.

I say, no.  Not this time.  Not this movie.  We will not fail our genre and the geeks that came before us- dreaming of this day- nor those destined to follow us.

Surely not!

Idris Elba is in it and tbh that’s enough for me

 

Dude it’s in IMAX 3D and it’s giant robots fighting monsters!

WHO THE FUCK DOESN’T WANT TO SEE A GIANT ROCK EM SOCK EM ROBOT WAIL ON A MONSTER USING A SHIP AS A BASEBALL BAT

(via migraineswithpictures)

“Why does Woody still make movies? Because he can. Because they still let him.”

—   Marshall Brickman, the cowriter of Annie Hall and Manhattan, on his friend and collaborator, Woody Allen — from Charles McGrath’s a nice feature on Allen.
(via parislemon)